On Thursday, June 21, hundreds of people gathered at Temple Emanuel for an evening of education and insight. The arrival of the Dead Sea Scrolls at Denver’s Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS) has seen popular attendance. It has also meant an influx of peripheral activities as people seek avenues to learn even more. Thursday’s event, brought about through the combined efforts of Colorado Council of Churches, JEWISHcolorado, Temple Emanuel and The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints highlighted three experts, both local and out of state. Dr. Donald Parry, BYU professor of Hebrew Bible and Dead Sea Scrolls, Dr. Samuel Boyd, CU professor of Judaic Studies, and Dr. Rick Hess, professor and Old Testament scholar at Denver Seminary were the evening’s panelists.

While Dr. Hess gave an overview of the origins and discovery of the scrolls, he also taught about the caves, the Qumran community, and the translations as they tie into our current codex. Dr. Boyd shared his passion for the Bible and how the scrolls influence our understanding of it. Of the thousands of scrolls and fragments found and translated, a portion of them are Biblical text, another portion are commentary on the text, while a third portion are writings related to the day. Between all of these sources, Dr. Boyd taught that what we understand about the Bible still leaves a lot of room for learning. (more…)


In 1846 Mormon settlers as part of the Mormon Battalion established a temporary settlement about one-half mile east of Pueblo on the south side of the Arkansas River. In total 275 men, women, and children from 4 different detachments made up this settlement.

They might not have known it at the time but this settlement was the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Colorado and was the first Anglo settlement of any form in what is now the modern state of Colorado.

On June 2nd and June 3rd 2018, the Fort Vasquez Museum in Platteville Colorado will be hosting a series of formal presentations about the Mormon Colony at Pueblo and the history of the fur trade along the forts of Colorado’s Front Range.  (more…)


A rare collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, generating interest among scholars and people of faith alike. Building on the excitement around this exhibit, two Denver-area religious institutions will host a panel discussion on “The Significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christianity”, featuring Dr. Craig Blomberg and Dr. Richard Hess of the Denver Seminary and Dr. Dana Pike from Brigham Young University. There are two opportunities to participate:
Thursday, May 3, 2018
7 p.m.
Denver Seminary Chapel
6399 S. Santa Fe Dr.
Littleton, CO 80120
Friday, May 4, 2018
7 p.m.
St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd.
Highlands Ranch, CO 80126
No reservations are needed for these two events. Please join us for a stimulating and faith-building experience, and make sure to plan your own visit to the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit at the museum.

Museums are full of exciting archeological finds. Visitors line up daily to view that which was once lost. At the Denver Museum of Nature and Science (DMNS), recent exhibitions have included discoveries from the days of Vikings, mummies from around the world, and a hands-on interface with the world of robotics. But of all the discoveries that fill the halls and interests of its patrons, one discovery stands above the rest in significance and import. That is the discovery of the Dead Sea Scrolls.

After a 10-year effort, the DMNS gained a victory in bringing the scrolls to the city of Denver. Scholars, religious academics, and experts alike are thrilled with the once in a lifetime chance to have the scrolls in close proximity. With great anticipation, those who know most about the historical weight of these scrolls prepare for their arrival. Once lost to the world, the transcripts of what has become the Bible were found by (more…)