Thursday, September 13 was an inspiring night. Thanks to the joint efforts from the Front Range and Columbine stakes and the Colorado Catholic Conference, 400+ attendees gathered for a Religious Freedom Forum in Columbine. With a full line-up of speakers, Colorado Mormon Chorale’s powerful patriotic numbers, and a timely message – the combined result was one to remember. Attendees learned the importance of standing for religious freedom, and increasing the ability to do so. Presenters tied together both examples of early leaders who created a framework to protect our freedoms, and the efforts that continue to maintain said freedoms. Elder Thomas Priday, Area Seventy of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, opened the evening, sharing gratitude for the opportunity for multiple faiths “to come together in unity.”

Rebecca Jenson, Public Affairs Director, North America Central Area, stands at attention during “The Star Spangled Banner”

As members of the Church of Jesus Christ, we are reminded regularly of our civic duties. Elder Bednar said recently, “There is a paradox in religious freedom — if I want my religious freedom to be protected, then I must protect the religious freedom of those who believe in a basically different way from my own. This is our task. And it will be our ongoing challenge. Religious freedom is more than a right; it is a duty.” (more…)


On Thursday evening congregations and believers from various faiths gathered together at Holy Family High School in Broomfield Colorado to learn more about Religious Freedom.

An estimated 515 total people were in attendance made up of members of Sikh, Latter Day Saint (Mormon), Catholic, Muslim, and other faiths that were invited to attend.

The purpose of the event was to help attendees to better understand what religious freedom is and what threatens it while equipping individuals with specific ideas and insights as to how to promote and defend religious freedom.

I am so grateful for this opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder at this event with our friends of other faith—in considering how we can each effectively promote and defend religious liberty with conviction and civility.  As the tide of evil rises all around us, so must our confident voices fill the air so those within our circle of influence (including those in the minority who may be especially vulnerable to baseless attacks against their personal expressions of religious conscience) know they are not alone in this great cause. -Jonathan Toronto, Attorney, Global Membership Chair of J Reuben Clark Law Society, and Director of Public Affairs, LDS Church, Denver

The event included a panel of three presenters who also took audience questions. Those panelists included

  • Steven Collis – Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice
    Group
  • Montse Alvarado – VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund
  • Deacon Geoffrey Bennett – VP, Parish and Community Relations, Catholic Charities (Archdiocese of Denver)

Standing for the religious freedom of people of all belief systems is becoming one of the most important causes of our time, not just in the United States but globally. An event like this—with Catholics, Muslims, members of the Church of Jesus Christ, Sikhs, and so many others—shows that we can all stand together to protect this very important freedom. I was grateful to see such an outstanding turnout. -Steven Collis

Participants learned from the presenters the history of religious freedom in this country, examples of current and ongoing threats to religious freedom, and specific actions steps that can be taken daily and in response to specific issues today.

Elder Priday, Area Seventy, was in attendance and kicked off the event with a discussion about how all believers need to come together to protect our right to worship in part by showing tolerance and understanding for all people.

As believers in God, we have a responsibility and duty to stand for truth, but in a way that is never disrespectful or resentful toward others.  The Lord Jesus Christ invites His followers to show love and to seek peace.  We all lose in an atmosphere of hostility or contention. -Elder Thomas T. Priday

Stay connected with ColoradoMormons.com and our Facebook page for future events like this throughout the state!


Most Americans are very familiar with the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, which, among other protections, allows individuals to engage in free religious exercise according to individual conscience.  Throughout America’s short history on the world stage, these constitutional rights have been a beacon to all who love freedom and who would respect individual agency in matters of faith.

Today more than ever religious freedom is being threatened by a number of different sources.  With this in mind, and in an effort to educate our community, various faiths and civic institutions are joining together to present an evening program designed to enable attendees to better understand, promote and defend religious liberty.

This “Standing for Religious Freedom in Our Community” program—hosted by the Colorado Catholic Conference and J. Reuben Clark Law Society, in partnership with the Becket Fund, local congregations of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Masjid Ikhlas (Metropolitan Denver North Islamic Center), among other participants—will be held on Thursday August 16th, at Holy Family High School in Broomfield, Colorado, from 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

In addition to legal experts Steven Collis (Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice Group), Jenny Kraska (Executive Director of the Colorado Catholic Conference) and Montse Alvarado (VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund), keynote remarks will be offered by Bishop Jorge Rodriguez (Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Denver) and Elder Thomas Priday (of the Seventy, of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).

At the close of the keynote and expert panel remarks, audience members will have an opportunity to raise questions in a town hall style program format, after which Imam ShemSadeen Ben-Masaud (Masjid Ikhlas) will offer a closing prayer.  Light refreshments will be provided following the event, and audience members will have an opportunity to mingle with program presenters.

“Religious freedom is a matter of profound importance to members of all religious faiths,” noted Jonathan Toronto, Global Membership Chair of the J. Reuben Clark Law Society and a public affairs representative for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  “We truly look forward to joining with our friends in this unique interfaith event—which is sure to strengthen all attendees in their approach to preserving and defending religious liberty.”

Holy Family High School is located at 5195 W 144th Ave, Broomfield, Colorado.  No registration is required to attend this event. If you would like to RSVP or share the event with friends you can do so via the Facebook event by clicking here.

Event planners will offer voter registration stations prior to and following the program for those who wish to ensure they are currently registered to vote.


In a planned “Day at the Capitol,” clergy and faith leaders met on Thursday, April 26, 2018. With a goal of uniting faith communities to engage and act in the political sphere, Catholic Charities organized a gathering of local pastors and clergy. In attendance were Elder Thomas T. Priday, Area Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, among many others. Deacon Geoff Bennett, Vice President of Parish and Community Relations for Catholic Charities spearheaded the event and began the morning with the vision for the group. He invited all to set aside doctrinal differences, “…agree on foundational issues, and tell our legislators that these things are important to us.” Stake presidents, priests, and other attendees shared thoughts on how to carry out this ecumenical vision. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila spoke next, further driving home the point about Christians’ needs to be active, informed constituents that help enact change. Quoting de Tocqueville, Archbishop Aquila taught, “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.” The meeting concluded with a presentation from Jenny Kraska, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, and president of the National Association of State Catholic Conference Directors (NASCCD). She helped educate the group about legislative advocacy, what it looks like, and how it’s carried out. The group concluded with a walk to the capitol, where they hoped to meet with local legislators. However, as Kraska taught, with politics you learn to be patient and flexible. Large crowds of teachers protesting salaries also chose Thursday to walk on the capitol; they arrived in such large numbers that religious leaders’ agenda took a back seat. Despite the change of plans, participants shared enthusiasm and gratitude for the meeting.

Elder Priday and Archbishop Aquila