In a planned “Day at the Capitol,” clergy and faith leaders met on Thursday, April 26, 2018. With a goal of uniting faith communities to engage and act in the political sphere, Catholic Charities organized a gathering of local pastors and clergy. In attendance were Elder Thomas T. Priday, Area Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, among many others. Deacon Geoff Bennett, Vice President of Parish and Community Relations for Catholic Charities spearheaded the event and began the morning with the vision for the group. He invited all to set aside doctrinal differences, “…agree on foundational issues, and tell our legislators that these things are important to us.” Stake presidents, priests, and other attendees shared thoughts on how to carry out this ecumenical vision. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila spoke next, further driving home the point about Christians’ needs to be active, informed constituents that help enact change. Quoting de Tocqueville, Archbishop Aquila taught, “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.” The meeting concluded with a presentation from Jenny Kraska, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, and president of the National Association of State Catholic Conference Directors (NASCCD). She helped educate the group about legislative advocacy, what it looks like, and how it’s carried out. The group concluded with a walk to the capitol, where they hoped to meet with local legislators. However, as Kraska taught, with politics you learn to be patient and flexible. Large crowds of teachers protesting salaries also chose Thursday to walk on the capitol; they arrived in such large numbers that religious leaders’ agenda took a back seat. Despite the change of plans, participants shared enthusiasm and gratitude for the meeting.

Elder Priday and Archbishop Aquila


A rare collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, generating interest among scholars and people of faith alike. Building on the excitement around this exhibit, two Denver-area religious institutions will host a panel discussion on “The Significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christianity”, featuring Dr. Craig Blomberg and Dr. Richard Hess of the Denver Seminary and Dr. Dana Pike from Brigham Young University. There are two opportunities to participate:
Thursday, May 3, 2018
7 p.m.
Denver Seminary Chapel
6399 S. Santa Fe Dr.
Littleton, CO 80120
Friday, May 4, 2018
7 p.m.
St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd.
Highlands Ranch, CO 80126
No reservations are needed for these two events. Please join us for a stimulating and faith-building experience, and make sure to plan your own visit to the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit at the museum.

Mike Alletto is a member of the Ponderosa congregation (ward)  in the Parker Stake. Recently he collapsed at DIA due to a severe stroke.

The healthcare professionals at CUHealth were amazed by his fast recovery. The day after his surgery his neurosurgeon found Mike in his recovery room reading a complex book. That kind of speedy recovery from a stroke this severe is extremely rare.

Mike credits his faith in Christ along with the work of the professionals at CUHealth for his fast recovery. The interesting side-story… how frustrated Mike was that he wouldn’t be at church on Sunday to teach his class.

“The only time we’d miss is if two things: if we go to see our grandkids or if I get stuck in the hospital because of a stroke,” Alletto said.

Below is a story recently published by 9News (more…)


Father Michael Richardson, Greg Bashaw, President Chad Larsen

On March 11th, the Parker Colorado Stake of The Church of Jesus of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) hosted the fourth annual Parker Interfaith Easter Night of Music.  The Night of Music is an opportunity for members of various faiths in the Parker area to come together and celebrate the Easter season through music.

This year, St. Matthew’s Episcopal Church was the honored guest for the evening.  Choirs and congregants from both churches performed sacred vocal and instrumental musical numbers.  The quality of the performances was nothing short of stunning.  There was a beautiful spirit present, with some pieces bringing several members of the audience to tears.

A highlight of the evening was when (more…)


Worldwide missionaries love to share the message of Jesus Christ in Song. Pictured here are Mormon missionaries performing at St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh Scotland

On February 11th from  7 pm to 8:30 pm Mormon missionaries in the Denver area will present a special musical presentation called “Why I Believe.”

The presentation will feature musical performances from sister and elder missionaries serving in the local area as well as messages which will be shared by recent converts to the Mormon church in Colorado.

The Musical Performance or “fireside” is open to everyone in the community, both members of the faith and those who are not currently of the Mormon faith.

“It promises to be an experience that will build one’s faith in Jesus Christ as our Savior and only way back to the father,” says Jacob Paulsen of the Denver North Public Affairs Council. “Come worship the Redeemer through song and testimony!”

No registration or tickets are required to attend. The presentation will be held at a Mormon meetinghouse located in Denver at 2710 S Monaco Pkwy.


When was the last time you saw a pair of Mormon missionaries walking down the street, knocking at your front door, or riding bikes in your neighborhood? Most of us have come to recognize the familiar white shirts and black nametags that are customary for Mormon missionaries.

With over 50,000 missionaries actively serving around the world, you may not be aware of how they are organized or directed. Here in part of the Denver metro, some missionaries have a new boss, or “Mission President” to look to.

The world is divided into over 400 geographic areas referred to as missions. Each of those missions is led and directed by a Mission President whose responsibilities include the supervision and welfare of the missionaries laboring in that geographic mission area.

The missionaries serving in the “Denver North Mission” are now getting used to working under the direction of a new Mission President, Henry Scott Savage and his wife Cindi Savage. Called President Savage and Sister Savage respectfully by members of the church and the missionaries in the area; the Savages arrived in Denver in July 2017. Ironically both President and Sister Savage served as missionaries in Colorado many years ago.

The Savages come most recently from Orem Utah where President Savage was a managing director for FranklinCovey Co. They will leave behind their career and other personal associations and labor in Colorado for 3 years. Mission presidents worldwide spend 3 years directing the missionary work in the mission to which they are called.


In a recent article by the Parker Chronicle about the 2017 State of the Bible report, local member of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (LDS), Anne Jefferies, was interviewed to discuss LDS church members’ participation in regular Bible study.

Highlighting LDS belief in the Bible, Jeffries cited LDS teenagers’ attendance at seminary and an emphasis in LDS homes on reading the scriptures daily. While general Bible readership among millennials is down in America, Jeffries mentioned that many millennial LDS members are raising their children to read the Bible daily, true to the church’s continual encouragement to do so. Referencing her own Bible study habits, Jeffries stated, “My reading daily supports me in becoming a better person in my home as well as in my community.”

For the full article: The State of the Bible in 2017 by Jessica Gibb

Anne Jefferies says reading the Bible is an important part of her family life, and something she encourages her children to do daily.


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Through the volunteer service website www.JustServe.org, and with gloves, rakes, wire cutters and boundless energy, approximately 75 volunteers made great strides in bringing Parker’s newest park to reality.   They filled the industrial size dumpster in less than an hour, then continued to work through the morning. Old fencing was removed, mountains of wood and metal were piled, cinder block buildings torn down, buildings cleared and much general clean-up accomplished.

A longtime summer resident, Mr. Ray Harvie donated the land to Douglas County Open Space. Once prepped, the county will turn the land over to the Town of Parker to become the Ray Harvie Park in his memory.  The event was co-sponsored by Douglas County Open Space and the Grandview Ward of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  One organizer observed,

“It’s amazing what dedicated volunteers can accomplish in a just a few short hours.  Our expectations have been greatly exceeded.”