Each year the Colorado Rockies select one home game to be “Mormon Night At the Rockies.”

This year’s game was well attended as members of the church statewide were able to purchase discounted tickets.

The Colorado Mormon Choral sang the national anthem, conducted by Kent Jones. This has become a wonderful tradition each year.

Also 3 young men from Boy Scout Troop 372 of the Alameda Congregation in Aurora presented the colors. (more…)


On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) attended a beautiful Iftar dinner hosted by Multicultural Mosaic Foundation (“Mosaic”), and its President, Ismail Akbulut.  The purpose of the event was to deepen friendships while increasing mutual understanding, among local Latter-day Saints and Muslims.

Elder Thomas T. Priday and Dr. Ismail Demirkan

In the tradition of Islam, an Iftar is the evening meal in which Muslims complete their daily fast as part of their holy month of Ramadan.  Throughout this special month, Muslims strive to more fully observe the principles of virtuous and generous living that are central to their beliefs.  For example, in his highly informative opening presentation (following a welcome given by Brother Akbulut), Mosaic’s Interfaith Director, Dr. Ismail Demirkan, explained that for devout Muslims the Ramadan fast is about abstaining from more than just from food and water, but from other more worldly activities and sin–indicating that one’s words, thoughts, and treatment of others receive greater attention during Ramadan. (more…)


Dr. Dana Pike lectures a full crowd on the history of the Dead Sea Scrolls

 

Thursday, May 3 marked the beginning of what will be a continuing series of forums about the Dead Sea Scrolls. Local interest in the scrolls has grown with the arrival of several scrolls from Israel, as the Denver Museum of Nature and Science hosts the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibition. Drs. Rick Hess, Dana Pike, and Craig Blomberg taught a standing room only crowd in the chapel on Denver Seminary campus in Littleton. Dr. Dana Pike, Department Chair of Ancient Scripture in the College of Religious Instruction at Brigham Young University gave an overview and background of the scrolls. Dr. Rick Hess, distinguished professor at Denver Seminary, followed with a lesson on the significance of the scrolls with regard to the Old Testament. Dr. Craig Blomberg, also a distinguished professor at Denver Seminary, rounded out the instruction with insight into how the scrolls tie in with the New Testament.

All three professors are members of the Society of Biblical Literature and interact regularly on topics of mutual interest. The three pointed out similarities between the oldest known Hebrew biblical texts created in 1008 AD and our present day Old Testament. With the exception of the book of Esther, all books of the Old Testament are represented in the Dead Sea Scrolls.  We learn more about specific importance as we see that multiple copies of select books of the Old Testament were found.  The top three most commonly found texts belong to Deuteronomy, Psalms, and Isaiah.  Interestingly, these three Old Testament books are also the most frequently referenced books of the Old Testament as one reads through the New Testament.

The presentations were followed with panel members asking one another questions, generating further discussion. The Q&A portion of the evening was conducted by Craig McIlroy, Director of Public Affairs for the Denver South Area for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. In addition to the friendly banter and questions among panelists, audience members were able to pose questions of their own, and the evening concluded on a positive note.

from left to right: Rev. Annie Arnoldy, Tom Reiners, Dr. Craig Blomberg, Dr. Dana Pike, Dr. Rick Hess and Craig McIlroy

The next day, presenters were hosted by Reverend Annie Arnoldy of St. Andrew United Methodist church of Highlands Ranch. They were joined by Tom Reiners, a lifelong member of the Methodist church. A retired rocket scientist and Dead Sea Scrolls enthusiast, Mr. Reiners serves as a docent at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science and takes tours of the exhibition. He added color commentary relevant to the exhibit. The four panelists gave the 450+ attendees a full evening of information and insight. In addition to Mr. Reiners’ contribution, Dr. Pike added further to his presentation, sharing a bit of his experience in Jerusalem.  His unique history includes being on the team of 70 plus translators who were invited by Israeli scholar Emmanuel Tov to help translate and publish the scrolls. He shared personal account of the 11 caves in which the 950 fragments were found, and the close connection he experienced with history.

More seminars similar to the two that took place last week are scheduled in the near future. Forums are scheduled for June 21 at Temple Emmanuel, June 22 in Parker, June 23 in our Arvada, and June 24 in Boulder.  Check back for details forthcoming.


In a planned “Day at the Capitol,” clergy and faith leaders met on Thursday, April 26, 2018. With a goal of uniting faith communities to engage and act in the political sphere, Catholic Charities organized a gathering of local pastors and clergy. In attendance were Elder Thomas T. Priday, Area Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, among many others. Deacon Geoff Bennett, Vice President of Parish and Community Relations for Catholic Charities spearheaded the event and began the morning with the vision for the group. He invited all to set aside doctrinal differences, “…agree on foundational issues, and tell our legislators that these things are important to us.” Stake presidents, priests, and other attendees shared thoughts on how to carry out this ecumenical vision. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila spoke next, further driving home the point about Christians’ needs to be active, informed constituents that help enact change. Quoting de Tocqueville, Archbishop Aquila taught, “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.” The meeting concluded with a presentation from Jenny Kraska, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, and president of the National Association of State Catholic Conference Directors (NASCCD). She helped educate the group about legislative advocacy, what it looks like, and how it’s carried out. The group concluded with a walk to the capitol, where they hoped to meet with local legislators. However, as Kraska taught, with politics you learn to be patient and flexible. Large crowds of teachers protesting salaries also chose Thursday to walk on the capitol; they arrived in such large numbers that religious leaders’ agenda took a back seat. Despite the change of plans, participants shared enthusiasm and gratitude for the meeting.

Elder Priday and Archbishop Aquila


A rare collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, generating interest among scholars and people of faith alike. Building on the excitement around this exhibit, two Denver-area religious institutions will host a panel discussion on “The Significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christianity”, featuring Dr. Craig Blomberg and Dr. Richard Hess of the Denver Seminary and Dr. Dana Pike from Brigham Young University. There are two opportunities to participate:
Thursday, May 3, 2018
7 p.m.
Denver Seminary Chapel
6399 S. Santa Fe Dr.
Littleton, CO 80120
Friday, May 4, 2018
7 p.m.
St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd.
Highlands Ranch, CO 80126
No reservations are needed for these two events. Please join us for a stimulating and faith-building experience, and make sure to plan your own visit to the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit at the museum.

After the attack on Columbine High School almost 19 years ago, each student and staff member at the school received a homemade quilt donated by people from Colorado and beyond. Mothers with children at the school remember how their children wrapped themselves in the blankets, drawing security and comfort knowing that people they didn’t even know cared about them. 

When the families of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, experienced their own heart-wrenching tragedy in February, many of those same Columbine mothers from a local church in Littleton felt their hearts breaking as they relived feelings of helplessness, anger and sorrow. 

The tragedy hit even closer to home than expected. Gordon and Pam Voorhees, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Littleton, have a granddaughter who attends Stoneman Douglas High School. While she made it out safely, two of her friends and fellow church members did not. The Littleton congregation decided to do something to help the youth in the Parkland LDS congregation know that many people care about them.  

“We remembered how much the quilts meant to our children, and decided to make fleece blankets for each of the youth in the LDS congregation where the three girls lived, one of whom was killed in the shootings,” said Jane Savage, who attended and helped organize the project. 

Church members quickly organized the project. Fabrics in cheerful prints and solids that “looked like Florida” were purchased with donated funds, and some fabric was donated by a person involved with the Columbine/Aurora Theater support group. All donors asked to remain anonymous. 

“The inspiration for the cuddle blankets came from our hearts breaking for these kids in Florida, wishing that no one would ever have to endure another shooting,” said Savage. “I remember the disbelief that such a thing could happen here, and realizing that the innocence of children had been stolen, and there was so little that anyone could do to relieve all that anguish.” 

An email notice was sent to all the women in the congregation, inviting them to help put the blankets together. With one day’s notice and on a holiday weekend, about 30 women, men and teenagers, as well as neighbors who just wanted to help. Some had children or grandchildren who had attended Columbine, but many did not. 

“It’s a relief to our aching hearts to be able to actually do something, instead of just feel bad for them,” said one of those who turned out to help. 

Tying the fleece blankets took about two and a half hours. The 26 blankets arrived in Florida on Saturday, so they could be distributed to the youth in the congregation on Sunday. Notes written by youth in the Columbine area were included and expressed love and prayers for their counterparts in Florida. 

Story by Babzanne Barker

Photo by Allison Barber

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Worldwide missionaries love to share the message of Jesus Christ in Song. Pictured here are Mormon missionaries performing at St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh Scotland

On February 11th from  7 pm to 8:30 pm Mormon missionaries in the Denver area will present a special musical presentation called “Why I Believe.”

The presentation will feature musical performances from sister and elder missionaries serving in the local area as well as messages which will be shared by recent converts to the Mormon church in Colorado.

The Musical Performance or “fireside” is open to everyone in the community, both members of the faith and those who are not currently of the Mormon faith.

“It promises to be an experience that will build one’s faith in Jesus Christ as our Savior and only way back to the father,” says Jacob Paulsen of the Denver North Public Affairs Council. “Come worship the Redeemer through song and testimony!”

No registration or tickets are required to attend. The presentation will be held at a Mormon meetinghouse located in Denver at 2710 S Monaco Pkwy.


While the many Christian denominations in Colorado have unique doctrines and different approaches to worship, they all share a fervent belief in Jesus Christ and a tradition of praising him in song.

 

Late in 2017, four congregations in the southwest suburbs of Denver gathered to do just that. The 20th Annual Interfaith Concert featured around 225 musicians from the Columbine Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, the Columbine United Church, St. Frances Cabrini Parish and St. Philip Lutheran Church. Around 600 people attended the performance.

 

“This is a wonderful event that brings us together to make a joyful noise as we focus not on our differences but on our common faith in Jesus Christ,” said Rev. Brad Doty, assistant pastor of St. Philip Lutheran Church.

 

The unique event began in 1997 with only two churches participating: The Columbine Stake and St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Parish. For twenty years both churches have continued to perform together, while welcoming up to three other local churches to join every year. Held in the fall, the Interfaith Concert has become a beloved start to the holiday season. (more…)