There might be a reason why it seems members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints don’t spend much time on the question: Are Mormons Christian? Perhaps it’s because it feels like an obvious conclusion. A straightforward definition of Christianity is believing Jesus Christ to be our Savior and Redeemer. And we do. With that, the discussion seems over. However, even as a child, I remember being challenged on this topic by classmates, and as an adult, it still comes up. It made no sense to me how a church called The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints could be seen as anything but Christian. Yet in the meantime, I’ve learned that there are some Christians who have a more specific definition of Christianity, and that is where we might diverge. Here are the important basics:

  1. Latter-day Saints do not accept the creeds, confessions, and formulations of post–New Testament Christianity.
  2. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does not descend through the historical line of traditional Christianity. That is, Latter-day Saints are not Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, or Protestant.
  3. Latter-day Saints do not believe scripture consists of the Holy Bible alone but have an expanded canon of scripture that includes the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price.

In unequivocal terms, we as members of the church assert belief in God, our eternal Father, his son Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. Some creeds call for a belief in the Holy Trinity, where it is understood that all three are without form and are one. We do not believe in a trinity. From there, other distinctions include (more…)


Each year the Colorado Rockies select one home game to be “Mormon Night At the Rockies.”

This year’s game was well attended as members of the church statewide were able to purchase discounted tickets.

The Colorado Mormon Choral sang the national anthem, conducted by Kent Jones. This has become a wonderful tradition each year.

Also 3 young men from Boy Scout Troop 372 of the Alameda Congregation in Aurora presented the colors. (more…)


In 1846 Mormon settlers as part of the Mormon Battalion established a temporary settlement about one-half mile east of Pueblo on the south side of the Arkansas River. In total 275 men, women, and children from 4 different detachments made up this settlement.

They might not have known it at the time but this settlement was the first branch of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints in Colorado and was the first Anglo settlement of any form in what is now the modern state of Colorado.

On June 2nd and June 3rd 2018, the Fort Vasquez Museum in Platteville Colorado will be hosting a series of formal presentations about the Mormon Colony at Pueblo and the history of the fur trade along the forts of Colorado’s Front Range.  (more…)


With the advent of a new temple coming to Northern Colorado, The Coloradoan – a local news publication – has recently released an article highlighting the growth of the LDS community in the area. Gary Foster, an LDS stake president in the Fort Collins area was interviewed along with other church leaders. President Foster was quoted as saying:

“Fort Collins is a value-friendly community and school-friendly community. That’s very appealing to LDS families,” Foster said. “There is a long tradition of very faithful members in this area and strong congregations that also makes it appealing. The advent of the temple will accelerate members of our faith preferring Fort Collins,”

The new Fort Collins temple will be the second temple in the state of Colorado and is expected to open sometime in 2016. (no official date has been determined yet).  A temple is a unique building for the LDS faith and is treated as the most sacred place to worship, more so than the local meeting houses. Learn more about temples here.

Fort-Collins-Colorado-Temple

The article also notes that even without the advent of a new temple in the area, the church has been growing. In Colorado, Latter-day Saints account for about 3 percent of the population. Over 150,000 members live in Colorado and the church is among the fastest-growing religious groups in the state. Check out the link below to read the full article.

The Coloradoan – Read the full article here