Each year the Colorado Rockies select one home game to be “Mormon Night At the Rockies.”

This year’s game was well attended as members of the church statewide were able to purchase discounted tickets.

The Colorado Mormon Choral sang the national anthem, conducted by Kent Jones. This has become a wonderful tradition each year.

Also 3 young men from Boy Scout Troop 372 of the Alameda Congregation in Aurora presented the colors. (more…)


On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) attended a beautiful Iftar dinner hosted by Multicultural Mosaic Foundation (“Mosaic”), and its President, Ismail Akbulut.  The purpose of the event was to deepen friendships while increasing mutual understanding, among local Latter-day Saints and Muslims.

Elder Thomas T. Priday and Dr. Ismail Demirkan

In the tradition of Islam, an Iftar is the evening meal in which Muslims complete their daily fast as part of their holy month of Ramadan.  Throughout this special month, Muslims strive to more fully observe the principles of virtuous and generous living that are central to their beliefs.  For example, in his highly informative opening presentation (following a welcome given by Brother Akbulut), Mosaic’s Interfaith Director, Dr. Ismail Demirkan, explained that for devout Muslims the Ramadan fast is about abstaining from more than just from food and water, but from other more worldly activities and sin–indicating that one’s words, thoughts, and treatment of others receive greater attention during Ramadan. (more…)


A rare collection of the Dead Sea Scrolls are now on display at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science, generating interest among scholars and people of faith alike. Building on the excitement around this exhibit, two Denver-area religious institutions will host a panel discussion on “The Significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls and Christianity”, featuring Dr. Craig Blomberg and Dr. Richard Hess of the Denver Seminary and Dr. Dana Pike from Brigham Young University. There are two opportunities to participate:
Thursday, May 3, 2018
7 p.m.
Denver Seminary Chapel
6399 S. Santa Fe Dr.
Littleton, CO 80120
Friday, May 4, 2018
7 p.m.
St. Andrew United Methodist Church
9203 S. University Blvd.
Highlands Ranch, CO 80126
No reservations are needed for these two events. Please join us for a stimulating and faith-building experience, and make sure to plan your own visit to the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit at the museum.

After the attack on Columbine High School almost 19 years ago, each student and staff member at the school received a homemade quilt donated by people from Colorado and beyond. Mothers with children at the school remember how their children wrapped themselves in the blankets, drawing security and comfort knowing that people they didn’t even know cared about them. 

When the families of Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida, experienced their own heart-wrenching tragedy in February, many of those same Columbine mothers from a local church in Littleton felt their hearts breaking as they relived feelings of helplessness, anger and sorrow. 

The tragedy hit even closer to home than expected. Gordon and Pam Voorhees, members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Littleton, have a granddaughter who attends Stoneman Douglas High School. While she made it out safely, two of her friends and fellow church members did not. The Littleton congregation decided to do something to help the youth in the Parkland LDS congregation know that many people care about them.  

“We remembered how much the quilts meant to our children, and decided to make fleece blankets for each of the youth in the LDS congregation where the three girls lived, one of whom was killed in the shootings,” said Jane Savage, who attended and helped organize the project. 

Church members quickly organized the project. Fabrics in cheerful prints and solids that “looked like Florida” were purchased with donated funds, and some fabric was donated by a person involved with the Columbine/Aurora Theater support group. All donors asked to remain anonymous. 

“The inspiration for the cuddle blankets came from our hearts breaking for these kids in Florida, wishing that no one would ever have to endure another shooting,” said Savage. “I remember the disbelief that such a thing could happen here, and realizing that the innocence of children had been stolen, and there was so little that anyone could do to relieve all that anguish.” 

An email notice was sent to all the women in the congregation, inviting them to help put the blankets together. With one day’s notice and on a holiday weekend, about 30 women, men and teenagers, as well as neighbors who just wanted to help. Some had children or grandchildren who had attended Columbine, but many did not. 

“It’s a relief to our aching hearts to be able to actually do something, instead of just feel bad for them,” said one of those who turned out to help. 

Tying the fleece blankets took about two and a half hours. The 26 blankets arrived in Florida on Saturday, so they could be distributed to the youth in the congregation on Sunday. Notes written by youth in the Columbine area were included and expressed love and prayers for their counterparts in Florida. 

Story by Babzanne Barker

Photo by Allison Barber

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Jefferson County is a better place because of The Action Center. Since 1968 The Action Center has provided an immediate response to basic human needs and promoted pathways to self-sufficiency for county residents and the homeless.

On February 10th Mormon women in the Arvada area came together to help The Action Center.

The women had the opportunity to purge the unnecessary out of their lives to benefit those in need.  They brought their used t-shirts to a Women’s Conference meeting where they transformed them into reusable grocery bags for The Action Center.

(more…)


Worldwide missionaries love to share the message of Jesus Christ in Song. Pictured here are Mormon missionaries performing at St Giles Cathedral in Edinburgh Scotland

On February 11th from  7 pm to 8:30 pm Mormon missionaries in the Denver area will present a special musical presentation called “Why I Believe.”

The presentation will feature musical performances from sister and elder missionaries serving in the local area as well as messages which will be shared by recent converts to the Mormon church in Colorado.

The Musical Performance or “fireside” is open to everyone in the community, both members of the faith and those who are not currently of the Mormon faith.

“It promises to be an experience that will build one’s faith in Jesus Christ as our Savior and only way back to the father,” says Jacob Paulsen of the Denver North Public Affairs Council. “Come worship the Redeemer through song and testimony!”

No registration or tickets are required to attend. The presentation will be held at a Mormon meetinghouse located in Denver at 2710 S Monaco Pkwy.


The Columbine Courier has highlighted a service project involving hundreds of volunteers from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints Columbine congregations along with the United Alliance and Lockheed Martin in support of Operation Santa Claus.

Operation Santa Claus is a nonprofit organization for which employees, their families and retirees volunteer to provide gifts and food to families in the Denver area. There were more than 400 volunteers who bought and wrapped presents, collected groceries and delivered them to 294 families that included 890 children.

Operation Santa Claus receives referrals of needy families from about a dozen nonprofits, including Jewish Family Services and the Salvation Army.

“They know the families that come to them for help,” Cowley said. “We ask for families who have kids.”

The Home Front Cares Inc., an organization that assists military families and those of veterans, also provided names of families for this year’s event. Volunteers meet at a local LDS meetinghouse to work like elves assembling and packaging the gifts.

Read more in the Columbine Courrier and Thank You Sandy Barnes for the great article.