Each year the Colorado Rockies select one home game to be “Mormon Night At the Rockies.”

This year’s game was well attended as members of the church statewide were able to purchase discounted tickets.

The Colorado Mormon Choral sang the national anthem, conducted by Kent Jones. This has become a wonderful tradition each year.

Also 3 young men from Boy Scout Troop 372 of the Alameda Congregation in Aurora presented the colors. (more…)


Most Americans are very familiar with the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, which, among other protections, allows individuals to engage in free religious exercise according to individual conscience.  Throughout America’s short history on the world stage, these constitutional rights have been a beacon to all who love freedom and who would respect individual agency in matters of faith.

Today more than ever religious freedom is being threatened by a number of different sources.  With this in mind, and in an effort to educate our community, various faiths and civic institutions are joining together to present an evening program designed to enable attendees to better understand, promote and defend religious liberty.

This “Standing for Religious Freedom in Our Community” program—hosted by the Colorado Catholic Conference and J. Reuben Clark Law Society, in partnership with the Becket Fund, local congregations of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Masjid Ikhlas (Metropolitan Denver North Islamic Center), among other participants—will be held on Thursday August 16th, at Holy Family High School in Broomfield, Colorado, from 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

In addition to legal experts Steven Collis (Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice Group), Jenny Kraska (Executive Director of the Colorado Catholic Conference) and Montse Alvarado (VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund), keynote remarks will be offered by Bishop Jorge Rodriguez (Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Denver) and Elder Thomas Priday (of the Seventy, of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).

At the close of the keynote and expert panel remarks, audience members will have an opportunity to raise questions in a town hall style program format, after which Imam ShemSadeen Ben-Masaud (Masjid Ikhlas) will offer a closing prayer.  Light refreshments will be provided following the event, and audience members will have an opportunity to mingle with program presenters.

“Religious freedom is a matter of profound importance to members of all religious faiths,” noted Jonathan Toronto, Global Membership Chair of the J. Reuben Clark Law Society and a public affairs representative for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  “We truly look forward to joining with our friends in this unique interfaith event—which is sure to strengthen all attendees in their approach to preserving and defending religious liberty.”

Holy Family High School is located at 5195 W 144th Ave, Broomfield, Colorado.  No registration is required to attend this event. If you would like to RSVP or share the event with friends you can do so via the Facebook event by clicking here.

Event planners will offer voter registration stations prior to and following the program for those who wish to ensure they are currently registered to vote.


Recently the Islamic Center of Boulder hosted an Interfaith event in partnership with the Boulder Mormon church. The Daily Camera, a local news publication covering Boulder Colorado, published a great piece about the event and its connection with the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit currently on display at the Museum of Nature and Science.

Before the event the Boulder Atonement Lutheran Church hosted an interfaith dinner which was attended by a number of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish leaders.

Below is an image of the piece on the Daily Camera website. Click on the image or click here to view the full write up.

(more…)


Missionaries from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, better known as Mormons, are performing their own musical about the life of a missionary. Over the past several months 4 missionaries have been working together to create an original musical production that will entertain and inspire audiences while portraying an accurate depiction of the life of a Mormon Missionary. This production is titled “Meet The Elders.” (more…)


On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) attended a beautiful Iftar dinner hosted by Multicultural Mosaic Foundation (“Mosaic”), and its President, Ismail Akbulut.  The purpose of the event was to deepen friendships while increasing mutual understanding, among local Latter-day Saints and Muslims.

Elder Thomas T. Priday and Dr. Ismail Demirkan

In the tradition of Islam, an Iftar is the evening meal in which Muslims complete their daily fast as part of their holy month of Ramadan.  Throughout this special month, Muslims strive to more fully observe the principles of virtuous and generous living that are central to their beliefs.  For example, in his highly informative opening presentation (following a welcome given by Brother Akbulut), Mosaic’s Interfaith Director, Dr. Ismail Demirkan, explained that for devout Muslims the Ramadan fast is about abstaining from more than just from food and water, but from other more worldly activities and sin–indicating that one’s words, thoughts, and treatment of others receive greater attention during Ramadan. (more…)


In a planned “Day at the Capitol,” clergy and faith leaders met on Thursday, April 26, 2018. With a goal of uniting faith communities to engage and act in the political sphere, Catholic Charities organized a gathering of local pastors and clergy. In attendance were Elder Thomas T. Priday, Area Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, among many others. Deacon Geoff Bennett, Vice President of Parish and Community Relations for Catholic Charities spearheaded the event and began the morning with the vision for the group. He invited all to set aside doctrinal differences, “…agree on foundational issues, and tell our legislators that these things are important to us.” Stake presidents, priests, and other attendees shared thoughts on how to carry out this ecumenical vision. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila spoke next, further driving home the point about Christians’ needs to be active, informed constituents that help enact change. Quoting de Tocqueville, Archbishop Aquila taught, “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.” The meeting concluded with a presentation from Jenny Kraska, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, and president of the National Association of State Catholic Conference Directors (NASCCD). She helped educate the group about legislative advocacy, what it looks like, and how it’s carried out. The group concluded with a walk to the capitol, where they hoped to meet with local legislators. However, as Kraska taught, with politics you learn to be patient and flexible. Large crowds of teachers protesting salaries also chose Thursday to walk on the capitol; they arrived in such large numbers that religious leaders’ agenda took a back seat. Despite the change of plans, participants shared enthusiasm and gratitude for the meeting.

Elder Priday and Archbishop Aquila


With his car windows almost entirely blocked and every inch of space stuffed with plastic bags, Travis, a volunteer from “Keep Colorado Warm,” happily took on the challenge of stuffing more in.

Recently, the Boulder Stake relief society came together to donate an impressive amount of winter clothing to the IMPACT program which collects badly-needed items to protect the needy from Colorado winters. When Travis showed up in his small hatchback, he realized he may have underestimated the generosity of these women.

“He was a bit surprised by the size of our donation,” said Wendy Ericson, a member of the Boulder Stake. “Miraculously, he was able to stuff all 18 bags full of winter clothing into his little hatchback. … He was very gracious and thrilled to receive it.”

More than 430 items were donated, including 164 coats, 107 hats and 66 pairs of gloves. One sister even sewed several hoodies herself for the cause.

The sisters sorted all the items, something that made IMPACT “especially happy” for, and they enjoyed hot chocolate and donuts along with good company.

“It was a labor of love,” Ericson said. “I was so touched by the love and generosity of the sisters and the warmth it will bring to others.”


Young Single Adults from the Mountain View Mormon Congregation were invited to attend an evening of dinner, dessert and conversation to build relationships with their peers attending CU from other faiths on February 27, 2018.

Zach Parris, CU Lutheran Ministries pastor leads a weekly student dinner called Bread and Belonging. Once a month Pastor Parris tries to have one interfaith/ecumenical guest to share in the meal and conversation. (more…)