There might be a reason why it seems members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints don’t spend much time on the question: Are Mormons Christian? Perhaps it’s because it feels like an obvious conclusion. A straightforward definition of Christianity is believing Jesus Christ to be our Savior and Redeemer. And we do. With that, the discussion seems over. However, even as a child, I remember being challenged on this topic by classmates, and as an adult, it still comes up. It made no sense to me how a church called The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints could be seen as anything but Christian. Yet in the meantime, I’ve learned that there are some Christians who have a more specific definition of Christianity, and that is where we might diverge. Here are the important basics:

  1. Latter-day Saints do not accept the creeds, confessions, and formulations of post–New Testament Christianity.
  2. The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does not descend through the historical line of traditional Christianity. That is, Latter-day Saints are not Roman Catholic, Eastern Orthodox, or Protestant.
  3. Latter-day Saints do not believe scripture consists of the Holy Bible alone but have an expanded canon of scripture that includes the Book of Mormon, the Doctrine and Covenants, and the Pearl of Great Price.

In unequivocal terms, we as members of the church assert belief in God, our eternal Father, his son Jesus Christ, and in the Holy Ghost. Some creeds call for a belief in the Holy Trinity, where it is understood that all three are without form and are one. We do not believe in a trinity. From there, other distinctions include adoption of the Nicene creed and the belief that all prophets and revelation from God are contained in, and do not extend beyond, the Bible. However, we believe The Book of Mormon to be the word of God, and is a book of scripture written by prophets about the coming of the Savior. We also believe in modern prophets and subscribe wholeheartedly to continuing revelation.

What does this mean to members of the church? We might understand a bit better why some say we aren’t Christian. It doesn’t mean we agree. For we are. Religious scholars, citing the above differences may say that members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints are not part of traditional, reformist or historical Christian sects. Scholars recognize, however, they’re referencing the creeds, reformist histories, and closed canon type of Christianity when they do. But when said in front of, and repeated by, the average lay person, this can bring confusion. With the simple definition of Christianity as belief in Jesus Christ, we as members of the restored church of Jesus Christ find that we are still answering the question that never seemed germane.

There is a lot to be said for the simplest approach being the best approach. Truly, if we as a group asserted that Christians are people who believe in and follow Jesus Christ, instead of overanalyzing semantics, we have room to grow together. As is evidenced by the multitude of Christian religions, the interpretation of doctrine varies. But does that matter? For as Jesus said, “be one, and if ye are not one ye are not mine.” What would happen if we embraced all whom declare themselves to be followers of Jesus, and included each other in Christian conversation?

Perhaps if I had the panache to eloquently converse with the early naysayers in my life, or even the current ones, I could simplify the discussion with my emphatic witness that I believe in and follow my Savior Jesus Christ. I’m humbled by his life of service and the sinless sacrifice that he offered for our eternal benefit. I rejoice in his resurrection and the hope of his Second Coming. Despite the doctrinal details where we differ, our hope is that, as disciples of Christ, we can come together in the virtuous application of a Christian life.


On Thursday evening congregations and believers from various faiths gathered together at Holy Family High School in Broomfield Colorado to learn more about Religious Freedom.

An estimated 515 total people were in attendance made up of members of Sikh, Latter Day Saint (Mormon), Catholic, Muslim, and other faiths that were invited to attend.

The purpose of the event was to help attendees to better understand what religious freedom is and what threatens it while equipping individuals with specific ideas and insights as to how to promote and defend religious freedom.

I am so grateful for this opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder at this event with our friends of other faith—in considering how we can each effectively promote and defend religious liberty with conviction and civility.  As the tide of evil rises all around us, so must our confident voices fill the air so those within our circle of influence (including those in the minority who may be especially vulnerable to baseless attacks against their personal expressions of religious conscience) know they are not alone in this great cause. -Jonathan Toronto, Attorney, Global Membership Chair of J Reuben Clark Law Society, and Director of Public Affairs, LDS Church, Denver

The event included a panel of three presenters who also took audience questions. Those panelists included

  • Steven Collis – Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice
    Group
  • Montse Alvarado – VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund
  • Deacon Geoffrey Bennett – VP, Parish and Community Relations, Catholic Charities (Archdiocese of Denver)

Standing for the religious freedom of people of all belief systems is becoming one of the most important causes of our time, not just in the United States but globally. An event like this—with Catholics, Muslims, members of the Church of Jesus Christ, Sikhs, and so many others—shows that we can all stand together to protect this very important freedom. I was grateful to see such an outstanding turnout. -Steven Collis

Participants learned from the presenters the history of religious freedom in this country, examples of current and ongoing threats to religious freedom, and specific actions steps that can be taken daily and in response to specific issues today.

Elder Priday, Area Seventy, was in attendance and kicked off the event with a discussion about how all believers need to come together to protect our right to worship in part by showing tolerance and understanding for all people.

As believers in God, we have a responsibility and duty to stand for truth, but in a way that is never disrespectful or resentful toward others.  The Lord Jesus Christ invites His followers to show love and to seek peace.  We all lose in an atmosphere of hostility or contention. -Elder Thomas T. Priday

Stay connected with ColoradoMormons.com and our Facebook page for future events like this throughout the state!


On July 10th 2018 Tyler Ker of Aurora Colorado was honored in a court of honor for achieving the rank of Eagle Scout. Tyler is a member of the Sable Ward and congregation which is located in the East Aurora area.

Eagle is the highest rank awarded to a young man and requires many hours of service, merit badges, and work in the community and in leadership with his troop. Notable in Tyler’s journey to Eagle was his Eagle project at which he designed and built shelving units to house instruments in the bad wing of Gateway High School during the summer of 2015.  (more…)


Each year the Colorado Rockies select one home game to be “Mormon Night At the Rockies.”

This year’s game was well attended as members of the church statewide were able to purchase discounted tickets.

The Colorado Mormon Choral sang the national anthem, conducted by Kent Jones. This has become a wonderful tradition each year.

Also 3 young men from Boy Scout Troop 372 of the Alameda Congregation in Aurora presented the colors. (more…)


Missionaries from The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints, better known as Mormons, are performing their own musical about the life of a missionary. Over the past several months 4 missionaries have been working together to create an original musical production that will entertain and inspire audiences while portraying an accurate depiction of the life of a Mormon Missionary. This production is titled “Meet The Elders.” (more…)


On Tuesday, May 22, 2018, members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints (Mormons) attended a beautiful Iftar dinner hosted by Multicultural Mosaic Foundation (“Mosaic”), and its President, Ismail Akbulut.  The purpose of the event was to deepen friendships while increasing mutual understanding, among local Latter-day Saints and Muslims.

Elder Thomas T. Priday and Dr. Ismail Demirkan

In the tradition of Islam, an Iftar is the evening meal in which Muslims complete their daily fast as part of their holy month of Ramadan.  Throughout this special month, Muslims strive to more fully observe the principles of virtuous and generous living that are central to their beliefs.  For example, in his highly informative opening presentation (following a welcome given by Brother Akbulut), Mosaic’s Interfaith Director, Dr. Ismail Demirkan, explained that for devout Muslims the Ramadan fast is about abstaining from more than just from food and water, but from other more worldly activities and sin–indicating that one’s words, thoughts, and treatment of others receive greater attention during Ramadan. (more…)


In a planned “Day at the Capitol,” clergy and faith leaders met on Thursday, April 26, 2018. With a goal of uniting faith communities to engage and act in the political sphere, Catholic Charities organized a gathering of local pastors and clergy. In attendance were Elder Thomas T. Priday, Area Seventy of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila, among many others. Deacon Geoff Bennett, Vice President of Parish and Community Relations for Catholic Charities spearheaded the event and began the morning with the vision for the group. He invited all to set aside doctrinal differences, “…agree on foundational issues, and tell our legislators that these things are important to us.” Stake presidents, priests, and other attendees shared thoughts on how to carry out this ecumenical vision. Archbishop Samuel J. Aquila spoke next, further driving home the point about Christians’ needs to be active, informed constituents that help enact change. Quoting de Tocqueville, Archbishop Aquila taught, “Liberty cannot be established without morality, nor morality without faith.” The meeting concluded with a presentation from Jenny Kraska, executive director of the Colorado Catholic Conference, and president of the National Association of State Catholic Conference Directors (NASCCD). She helped educate the group about legislative advocacy, what it looks like, and how it’s carried out. The group concluded with a walk to the capitol, where they hoped to meet with local legislators. However, as Kraska taught, with politics you learn to be patient and flexible. Large crowds of teachers protesting salaries also chose Thursday to walk on the capitol; they arrived in such large numbers that religious leaders’ agenda took a back seat. Despite the change of plans, participants shared enthusiasm and gratitude for the meeting.

Elder Priday and Archbishop Aquila


Each week the staff at Buckley Air Force Base in Aurora Colorado highlight one of their own. These weekly posts introduce someone on base by giving a short bio. This last week we saw a familiar face on the Facebook Page…

Here is the post that was shared by the Base:

For this week’s #MeetTeamBuckley we are highlighting Staff Sgt. Vance R. Boyer, 460th Security Forces Squadron. Boyer was born and raised in Idaho Falls, Idaho. He went to middle school and high school in the small town of Firth, Idaho. He worked on, you guessed it, a potato farm. “Spud harvest” is how most of the high schoolers in the area make their money.

After high school, and a brief stint in college, Boyer decided to serve as a full-time missionary for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints; he was called to serve in what is called the Argentina, Neuquen Mission, which covered most of the Patagonia region of southern Argentina. There, he became fluent in the Spanish language by talking to people all day every day. “I absolutely loved my mission, and being a missionary! It was one of the highlights of my life,” said Boyer. When he returned from his mission, Boyer continued to attend Brigham Young University – Idaho, where he studied Recreation Leadership. In one of his classes he met his now wife, Lauren. They married before he graduated with his B.S. in 2013. He knew joining the military would be a great way to start a family. He became a Security Forces specialist and moved to Buckley AFB as his first duty station in October of 2014. After less than a year at Buckley, he deployed to Saudi Arabia.

From the beginning of his time at Buckley, Boyer has been known as “Smiley” by many people who see his cheerful face at the gate. He has certainly helped establish a positive image of policing on Buckley AFB. He was hand selected to work at the Buckley Visitor Center for the past year because it allowed him to interact face-to-face with the public. Boyer completed Airman Leadership School in November 2017, earning the prestigious John L. Levitow Award. He and his wife have been married nearly 6 years and have two beautiful daughters.

“I really love my job and I love the Air Force; it has been great for me and my family. I hope to project a positive image of the Air Force, for Security Forces, and of law enforcement in general,” said Boyer.

(more…)