In what has become an annual tradition, youth from the Boulder area congregations of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints came together to perform a service project that starts and ends with BLT.

They started at a local meetinghouse in Broomfield and split the area into sections. These young men and young women then went door to door asking if they could rake leaves. They asked that a canned food donation for FISH, the local food pantry, be donated in exchange for the service, but would rake leaves regardless of donation.

They raked for a total of 2 hours. In total, they collected 468 lbs of food and $361 for the food bank. They raked 374 bags of leaves. (more…)


For the second year the Aurora Stake held it’s Community Veterans Day Concert at the Leadership Development Center on Buckley Air Force Base. The base has been part of the Aurora community since 1938 and makes for a great place to host a Veterans Day Concert.

There are almost 400,000 US military veterans in Colorado according to the US Census Bureau and many of them served in the Air Force and were stationed at Buckley.

In attendance were Base Commanding Officers, Community Leaders, Representatives from Aurora Fire, and friends from the Sikh faith. Gurpreet of Gurdwara Singh Sabha Colorado gave the invocation and Elder Thomas Priday of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints gave the benediction.

Colorado Mormon Chorale and Orchestra, conducted by Kent Jones provided all the music.


Earlier in 2018, a group of talented missionaries put together a musical presentation called “Meet the Elders.” The presentation aimed to inspire and educate members of the church and their friends and neighbors about the life and goals of a missionary.

During the course of several weeks, the “Meet the Elders” program was presented 6 different times across the Denver Metro from Parker to Boulder. Now the studio recordings of the songs featured in the program have been released.

This music was performed by:

Elder Brenden Blackham
Elder Connor Brown
Elder Alex Hasse
Elder Jacob Fenske

It is being published here with their permission.

Use the links below to download the MP3 files for each individual song to your computer or mobile device.

(more…)


On the evening of October 28, 2018, several members of the Church’s Denver Public Affairs Council attended a special Community Solidarity Vigil, hosted by Jewish Colorado at Temple Emanuel in Denver.  At the vigil, representatives of the Church were able to visit with Rabbi Joseph Black, who conducted the evening event, and convey the love, condeolences and support of Elder Thomas T. Priday (Area Seventy) and local members of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, in response to this weekend’s senseless tragedy at the Tree of Life Synagogue in Pittsburgh.

The vigil, which attracted thousands of members of the community and allowed for standing room only throughout the Synagogue, was an inspiring demonstration of love and interfaith unity within the greater Denver area.  Program participants included representatives of the Anti Defamation League, Governor John Hickenlooper, Denver Mayor Michael Hancock, as well as members of the Denver and Aurora police departments and a number of prominent interfaith leaders from the community–representing Christians, Jews, Muslims, and Sikhs, among others.  Speakers focused on the need for the elimination of hate and bias in our society as well as a feeling of safety and security in our places of worship.

Following the event, Sister Karen LaCouture, Interfaith specialist for the Church of Jesus Christ’s Denver area, stated “I was most grateful and impressed that so many people from all walks of life were drawn together to the vigil at Temple Emanuel in support of our Jewish brothers and sisters, as well as those of all faiths who may be the target of hate, violence or misunderstanding.”  Her words echoed those of Church President Russell M. Nelson who, just this week while meeting with media in Uruguay, remarked that Church members and those of other faiths “need to work together to stem the tide of violence.” He added, “The teachings of the Lord are clear. There is to be no contention, no disputation. We should love one another. So violence has no place in society.”


There With Care is a national charitable organization that helps and supports families going through significant medical crises. Recently a representative from the Boulder chapter visited Sisters of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints during a planned service project to share some of the specific needs the organization has.

That evening these wonderful sisters gathered donations and decorated grocery bags used by families being served by There With Care.

Julie Hess of There With Care shared these thoughts after the activity

I wanted to take the time, again, to thank you for giving me the opportunity to share the mission of There With Care at your church this week.  I so enjoyed getting to know this wonderful group of women and I am so impressed with their eagerness to help and to give back to their community. I loved looking through the decorated grocery bags and seeing everyone’s artistic style!  As I mentioned, the families have let us know repeatedly that this extra bit of CARE demonstrated by decorating the bags really helps to boost their spirits. We are also so incredibly grateful for the large amount of grocery and baby items you were able to donate.  WOW!  I think that was one of our largest “wish list” donation yet! Please share with the women a big THANK YOU from There With Care!

Donations gathered for There With Care


Last month the Reporter-Herald published an article reviewing the recent trek of 235 local youth from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Wyoming. What follows is the article from the Reporter-Herald:

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Mormon teens from Loveland follow pioneer trails

Reporter-Herald Staff
A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and

A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and push handcarts as they re-enact what pioneers went through on the historic Oregon Trail, Pony Express Trail and Mormon Pioneer Trail in Wyoming. (Christopher Gilmore)

Loveland teens follow historic trails

More than 235 local youths and their leaders recently re-enacted their pioneer ancestry by trekking 30 miles in Wyoming.

The 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints donned pioneer-era clothing and pushed handcarts across 30 miles of the historic Oregon Trail, Pony Express Trail and Mormon Pioneer Trail in Wyoming.

The group trekked through the summer heat to cross historic sites, including Martin’s Cove, Sweet Water River, Sage Creek and Rocky Ridge, according to a press release from the church. At each location, missionaries from the Wyoming Trail Mission taught the youths about the history of pioneers and how the West was settled.

As part of the re-enactment, the youth were separated into 25 groups, or “families,” which each included a “Ma and Pa,” adult leaders who made sure the teens were safe and hydrated, and helped them share the work in pushing the handcarts and setting up their tents each evening.

Each night at their campsites, the youths engaged in fun, historically accurate activities, such as square dancing and tug-of-war.

“By re-enacting their pioneer ancestors, the group experienced firsthand the faith and determination of the pioneers,” the release said.

Lorayne Jacques, who acted as a “Ma” for one of the “family” groups, said 500,000 to 600,000 pioneers made the historic trek West; 70,000 of them were Mormon pioneers.

“The trek taught us to appreciate the sacrifices of our pioneer ancestors so we could have what we have today. In our modern world, we really don’t understand how hard life was and that our ancestors deserve a lot of respect,” she said.

“I thought it was really cool,” Emily Call, a senior at Colorado Early Colleges Fort Collins High School, said in the release. “Especially when we were going up Rocky Ridge and there were places when the handcart would keep stopping, and we’d keep trying. It was really eye opening, when we were doing it in the summer with clear trails and nice shoes, and pioneers were doing it without shoes and had eaten maybe a little flour. It was really inspiring to see what they went through.”

Kathryn Hardy, who organized the pioneer trek with her husband Jody Hardy, praised the teens. “It was no small feat, hiking almost 30 miles with handcarts. And the kids had positive attitudes and many stepped up and help in areas where there was a little weakness. I’m super proud and impressed with them. We couldn’t have asked for a better experience.”

A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and

A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and push handcarts as they re-enact what pioneers went through on the historic Oregon Trail, Pony Express Trail and Mormon Pioneer Trail in Wyoming. (Christopher Gilmore)


On August 11th, the Denver Colorado Stake comprised of a number of LDS congregations in the city, participated in the city of Denver’s annual city celebration of community and service — Denver Days.

Five years ago Mayor Hancock set aside the first week of August as a week to encourage neighbors to get to know their neighbors by hosting block parties, picnics, and service projects with the focus on small organic gatherings.

The church members teamed with Denver Parks and Recreation to mulch, weed, pick up trash, and paint a large city park adjacent to a Denver LDS Church Building. With the help of about 50 members from the stake and 20 missionaries from the Denver North Mission, we spread 24 yards of mulch, used 1 gallon of paint, and collected 165 gallons of debris.

One of the highlights of the morning was a visit from the Mayor of Denver, Mayor Michael B. Hancock. He spent about 30 minutes visiting with members, missionaries, and local LDS leaders including Stake President Peter Krumholtz, public affairs leaders, and Elder Thomas T. Priday of the area Seventy.

It was a morning of hard work and many smiles from all who participated, old and young!

In response to the service from church members, Denver Parks and Recreation sent the following kind words. (more…)


On Thursday evening congregations and believers from various faiths gathered together at Holy Family High School in Broomfield Colorado to learn more about Religious Freedom.

An estimated 515 total people were in attendance made up of members of Sikh, Latter Day Saint (Mormon), Catholic, Muslim, and other faiths that were invited to attend.

The purpose of the event was to help attendees to better understand what religious freedom is and what threatens it while equipping individuals with specific ideas and insights as to how to promote and defend religious freedom.

I am so grateful for this opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder at this event with our friends of other faith—in considering how we can each effectively promote and defend religious liberty with conviction and civility.  As the tide of evil rises all around us, so must our confident voices fill the air so those within our circle of influence (including those in the minority who may be especially vulnerable to baseless attacks against their personal expressions of religious conscience) know they are not alone in this great cause. -Jonathan Toronto, Attorney, Global Membership Chair of J Reuben Clark Law Society, and Director of Public Affairs, LDS Church, Denver

The event included a panel of three presenters who also took audience questions. Those panelists included

  • Steven Collis – Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice
    Group
  • Montse Alvarado – VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund
  • Deacon Geoffrey Bennett – VP, Parish and Community Relations, Catholic Charities (Archdiocese of Denver)

Standing for the religious freedom of people of all belief systems is becoming one of the most important causes of our time, not just in the United States but globally. An event like this—with Catholics, Muslims, members of the Church of Jesus Christ, Sikhs, and so many others—shows that we can all stand together to protect this very important freedom. I was grateful to see such an outstanding turnout. -Steven Collis

Participants learned from the presenters the history of religious freedom in this country, examples of current and ongoing threats to religious freedom, and specific actions steps that can be taken daily and in response to specific issues today.

Elder Priday, Area Seventy, was in attendance and kicked off the event with a discussion about how all believers need to come together to protect our right to worship in part by showing tolerance and understanding for all people.

As believers in God, we have a responsibility and duty to stand for truth, but in a way that is never disrespectful or resentful toward others.  The Lord Jesus Christ invites His followers to show love and to seek peace.  We all lose in an atmosphere of hostility or contention. -Elder Thomas T. Priday

Stay connected with ColoradoMormons.com and our Facebook page for future events like this throughout the state!