Last month the Reporter-Herald published an article reviewing the recent trek of 235 local youth from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Wyoming. What follows is the article from the Reporter-Herald:

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Mormon teens from Loveland follow pioneer trails

Reporter-Herald Staff
A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and

A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and push handcarts as they re-enact what pioneers went through on the historic Oregon Trail, Pony Express Trail and Mormon Pioneer Trail in Wyoming. (Christopher Gilmore)

Loveland teens follow historic trails

More than 235 local youths and their leaders recently re-enacted their pioneer ancestry by trekking 30 miles in Wyoming.

The 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints donned pioneer-era clothing and pushed handcarts across 30 miles of the historic Oregon Trail, Pony Express Trail and Mormon Pioneer Trail in Wyoming.

The group trekked through the summer heat to cross historic sites, including Martin’s Cove, Sweet Water River, Sage Creek and Rocky Ridge, according to a press release from the church. At each location, missionaries from the Wyoming Trail Mission taught the youths about the history of pioneers and how the West was settled.

As part of the re-enactment, the youth were separated into 25 groups, or “families,” which each included a “Ma and Pa,” adult leaders who made sure the teens were safe and hydrated, and helped them share the work in pushing the handcarts and setting up their tents each evening.

Each night at their campsites, the youths engaged in fun, historically accurate activities, such as square dancing and tug-of-war.

“By re-enacting their pioneer ancestors, the group experienced firsthand the faith and determination of the pioneers,” the release said.

Lorayne Jacques, who acted as a “Ma” for one of the “family” groups, said 500,000 to 600,000 pioneers made the historic trek West; 70,000 of them were Mormon pioneers.

“The trek taught us to appreciate the sacrifices of our pioneer ancestors so we could have what we have today. In our modern world, we really don’t understand how hard life was and that our ancestors deserve a lot of respect,” she said.

“I thought it was really cool,” Emily Call, a senior at Colorado Early Colleges Fort Collins High School, said in the release. “Especially when we were going up Rocky Ridge and there were places when the handcart would keep stopping, and we’d keep trying. It was really eye opening, when we were doing it in the summer with clear trails and nice shoes, and pioneers were doing it without shoes and had eaten maybe a little flour. It was really inspiring to see what they went through.”

Kathryn Hardy, who organized the pioneer trek with her husband Jody Hardy, praised the teens. “It was no small feat, hiking almost 30 miles with handcarts. And the kids had positive attitudes and many stepped up and help in areas where there was a little weakness. I’m super proud and impressed with them. We couldn’t have asked for a better experience.”

A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and

A group of 14- to 18-year-olds and their leaders from the Loveland Stake of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints wear pioneer-era clothing and push handcarts as they re-enact what pioneers went through on the historic Oregon Trail, Pony Express Trail and Mormon Pioneer Trail in Wyoming. (Christopher Gilmore)


On August 11th, the Denver Colorado Stake comprised of a number of LDS congregations in the city, participated in the city of Denver’s annual city celebration of community and service — Denver Days.

Five years ago Mayor Hancock set aside the first week of August as a week to encourage neighbors to get to know their neighbors by hosting block parties, picnics, and service projects with the focus on small organic gatherings.

The church members teamed with Denver Parks and Recreation to mulch, weed, pick up trash, and paint a large city park adjacent to a Denver LDS Church Building. With the help of about 50 members from the stake and 20 missionaries from the Denver North Mission, we spread 24 yards of mulch, used 1 gallon of paint, and collected 165 gallons of debris.

One of the highlights of the morning was a visit from the Mayor of Denver, Mayor Michael B. Hancock. He spent about 30 minutes visiting with members, missionaries, and local LDS leaders including Stake President Peter Krumholtz, public affairs leaders, and Elder Thomas T. Priday of the area Seventy.

It was a morning of hard work and many smiles from all who participated, old and young!

In response to the service from church members, Denver Parks and Recreation sent the following kind words. (more…)


On Thursday evening congregations and believers from various faiths gathered together at Holy Family High School in Broomfield Colorado to learn more about Religious Freedom.

An estimated 515 total people were in attendance made up of members of Sikh, Latter Day Saint (Mormon), Catholic, Muslim, and other faiths that were invited to attend.

The purpose of the event was to help attendees to better understand what religious freedom is and what threatens it while equipping individuals with specific ideas and insights as to how to promote and defend religious freedom.

I am so grateful for this opportunity to stand shoulder to shoulder at this event with our friends of other faith—in considering how we can each effectively promote and defend religious liberty with conviction and civility.  As the tide of evil rises all around us, so must our confident voices fill the air so those within our circle of influence (including those in the minority who may be especially vulnerable to baseless attacks against their personal expressions of religious conscience) know they are not alone in this great cause. -Jonathan Toronto, Attorney, Global Membership Chair of J Reuben Clark Law Society, and Director of Public Affairs, LDS Church, Denver

The event included a panel of three presenters who also took audience questions. Those panelists included

  • Steven Collis – Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice
    Group
  • Montse Alvarado – VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund
  • Deacon Geoffrey Bennett – VP, Parish and Community Relations, Catholic Charities (Archdiocese of Denver)

Standing for the religious freedom of people of all belief systems is becoming one of the most important causes of our time, not just in the United States but globally. An event like this—with Catholics, Muslims, members of the Church of Jesus Christ, Sikhs, and so many others—shows that we can all stand together to protect this very important freedom. I was grateful to see such an outstanding turnout. -Steven Collis

Participants learned from the presenters the history of religious freedom in this country, examples of current and ongoing threats to religious freedom, and specific actions steps that can be taken daily and in response to specific issues today.

Elder Priday, Area Seventy, was in attendance and kicked off the event with a discussion about how all believers need to come together to protect our right to worship in part by showing tolerance and understanding for all people.

As believers in God, we have a responsibility and duty to stand for truth, but in a way that is never disrespectful or resentful toward others.  The Lord Jesus Christ invites His followers to show love and to seek peace.  We all lose in an atmosphere of hostility or contention. -Elder Thomas T. Priday

Stay connected with ColoradoMormons.com and our Facebook page for future events like this throughout the state!


On July 10th 2018 Tyler Ker of Aurora Colorado was honored in a court of honor for achieving the rank of Eagle Scout. Tyler is a member of the Sable Ward and congregation which is located in the East Aurora area.

Eagle is the highest rank awarded to a young man and requires many hours of service, merit badges, and work in the community and in leadership with his troop. Notable in Tyler’s journey to Eagle was his Eagle project at which he designed and built shelving units to house instruments in the bad wing of Gateway High School during the summer of 2015.  (more…)


Each year the Colorado Rockies select one home game to be “Mormon Night At the Rockies.”

This year’s game was well attended as members of the church statewide were able to purchase discounted tickets.

The Colorado Mormon Choral sang the national anthem, conducted by Kent Jones. This has become a wonderful tradition each year.

Also 3 young men from Boy Scout Troop 372 of the Alameda Congregation in Aurora presented the colors. (more…)


Most Americans are very familiar with the First Amendment to the United States Constitution, which, among other protections, allows individuals to engage in free religious exercise according to individual conscience.  Throughout America’s short history on the world stage, these constitutional rights have been a beacon to all who love freedom and who would respect individual agency in matters of faith.

Today more than ever religious freedom is being threatened by a number of different sources.  With this in mind, and in an effort to educate our community, various faiths and civic institutions are joining together to present an evening program designed to enable attendees to better understand, promote and defend religious liberty.

This “Standing for Religious Freedom in Our Community” program—hosted by the Colorado Catholic Conference and J. Reuben Clark Law Society, in partnership with the Becket Fund, local congregations of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints and Masjid Ikhlas (Metropolitan Denver North Islamic Center), among other participants—will be held on Thursday August 16th, at Holy Family High School in Broomfield, Colorado, from 6:30 to 8:30 pm.

In addition to legal experts Steven Collis (Chair, J. Reuben Clark Law Society, Denver Chapter, and Chair of Holland & Hart’s National Religious Institutions and First Amendment Practice Group), Jenny Kraska (Executive Director of the Colorado Catholic Conference) and Montse Alvarado (VP and Executive Director of the Becket Fund), keynote remarks will be offered by Bishop Jorge Rodriguez (Auxiliary Bishop of the Archdiocese of Denver) and Elder Thomas Priday (of the Seventy, of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints).

At the close of the keynote and expert panel remarks, audience members will have an opportunity to raise questions in a town hall style program format, after which Imam ShemSadeen Ben-Masaud (Masjid Ikhlas) will offer a closing prayer.  Light refreshments will be provided following the event, and audience members will have an opportunity to mingle with program presenters.

“Religious freedom is a matter of profound importance to members of all religious faiths,” noted Jonathan Toronto, Global Membership Chair of the J. Reuben Clark Law Society and a public affairs representative for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints.  “We truly look forward to joining with our friends in this unique interfaith event—which is sure to strengthen all attendees in their approach to preserving and defending religious liberty.”

Holy Family High School is located at 5195 W 144th Ave, Broomfield, Colorado.  No registration is required to attend this event. If you would like to RSVP or share the event with friends you can do so via the Facebook event by clicking here.

Event planners will offer voter registration stations prior to and following the program for those who wish to ensure they are currently registered to vote.


Recently the Islamic Center of Boulder hosted an Interfaith event in partnership with the Boulder Mormon church. The Daily Camera, a local news publication covering Boulder Colorado, published a great piece about the event and its connection with the Dead Sea Scrolls exhibit currently on display at the Museum of Nature and Science.

Before the event the Boulder Atonement Lutheran Church hosted an interfaith dinner which was attended by a number of Christian, Muslim, and Jewish leaders.

Below is an image of the piece on the Daily Camera website. Click on the image or click here to view the full write up.

(more…)


Dr. Skinner Presents to A Full Crowd At Trinity Presbyterian Church

A standing room only crowd gathered for part 3 of a 4 event lecture series on the Dead Sea Scrolls in Arvada on Saturday, June 23. The event, which was hosted by Trinity Presbyterian Church and
sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, drew members from both faiths as well as others from the community who were interested in learning more about the origins of the scrolls and their relevance to modern religious beliefs.

The Dead Sea Scrolls have been a recent curiosity in the area due to the exhibition at the Denver Museum of Nature and Science which opened March 13. The first scrolls were discovered in 1947 in the Qumran community located on the Northwest shore of the Dead Sea.

At the lecture event, entitled “The Religious and Archaeological Significance of the Dead Sea Scrolls” presentations were made by Dr. Andrew Skinner – BYU Professor of Ancient Scripture and Former Dean of Religious Education and Dr. Craig Blomberg – Distinguished Professor of New Testament at the Denver Seminary. (more…)